nocogsorwheels

glowcloud:

halaalpussy:

christel-thoughts:

thebloominuniverse:

This is the back of james’ head. He hasn’t washed or brushed his hair in months, and all of it was pretty much dreaded. We just picked all of it our except this big one underneath that was too far gone! White peoples’ hair does dread naturally my friends :)

how many times do we have to say this… LOC’D BLACK PEOPLE WASH AND TEND TO THEIR HAIR REGULARLY. THERE IS NOTHING “NATURAL” ABOUT WHAT YOU’RE DOING. IT IS GROSS. IT IS UNKEMPT. IT IS EVERYTHING BLACKS WITH NATURAL HAIR ARE ACCUSED OF BEING WHEN WE ACTUALLY ARE NOT THAT. HOW DO YOU NOT GET THAT ACCUSING US OF BEING DIRTY, BY ASSERTING THIS IS THE SAME THING AS BLACKS WITH LOC’D HAIR, IS SOME WHITE SUPREMACIST FUCKSHIT?

thats not dreads thats mange

it literally looks like there is a turd growing out of his neck

nocogsorwheels

stand-by-me:

Someone let me know when they find my jaw on the ground

candidlycara
candidlycara:

This is Caleb Orozco, the only LGBTQ activist in his country showing me the back of his home in Belize City, Belize.
We are currently working on a film about him. In Belize it is illegal to be gay according to section 53 of the criminal code. Caleb Orozco, activist and director/founder of UniBAM (United Belize Advocacy Movement) has been fighting to change the laws and bring equality to Belize, despite numerous personal sacrifices and risking his personal safety.  In this film we will interview Caleb, his lawyer, his opponents, and his supporters. The film aspires to tell his story, and the struggles of the LGBTQ* community in Belize.
To donate in order to help us fund this project, and to learn more, please click here.

candidlycara:

This is Caleb Orozco, the only LGBTQ activist in his country showing me the back of his home in Belize City, Belize.

We are currently working on a film about him. In Belize it is illegal to be gay according to section 53 of the criminal code. Caleb Orozco, activist and director/founder of UniBAM (United Belize Advocacy Movement) has been fighting to change the laws and bring equality to Belize, despite numerous personal sacrifices and risking his personal safety.  In this film we will interview Caleb, his lawyer, his opponents, and his supporters. The film aspires to tell his story, and the struggles of the LGBTQ* community in Belize.

To donate in order to help us fund this project, and to learn more, please click here.

sashayed
If someone called me pretty, I’d sneer and smear more glitter on my face. I didn’t want to be just pretty — I was wild, crazy and free. I talked about sex, about drinking. When men do that, it’s rock and roll, but when I did it, people assumed I was a train wreck. I played confident but still felt like an outcast.